Alzheimer’s Association Partners With AARP on Understanding Alzheimer’s & Dementia Webinar

Join Alzheimer’s Association and AARP on March 30 at 3:00 p.m. for a webinar on Understanding Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia.  They will give you a great framework to guide both you and a loved one through this difficult process.  To register, click on this link:

https://action.alz.org/PersonifyEbusiness/Events/ALZ/MeetingRegistration.aspx?productId=73583196

Regular readers of my blog know that both my father and grandmother had this terrible disease when they passed away.  There are great people at our local chapter of Alzheimer’s Association in Ryan’s Ranch.  They also have a 24-hour hotline if you need support at 800-272-3900.

https://action.alz.org/PersonifyEbusiness/Default.aspx?TabID=1356&productId=73583196

Carmel, CA Alzheimer’s Disease Can Be Kept At Bay By Having An Active Lifestyle

At Family inHome Caregiving we believe it’s important for our senior clients to have a healthy diet, social interaction and the proper amount of exercise.  That can be a challenge with COVID-19, particularly social interaction.  Teach your loved ones how to use zoom or skype.  A telephone call now and again is fine, but it’s not enough.  Seniors need face-to-face interaction with their family.  The Wall Street Journal recently ran a story about this issue, and pointed to a study where researchers compared the cognitive performance of mice who lived alone in empty cages with those who lived in large houses equipped with colorful Lego blocks for mental stimulation, running wheels for exercise and other mice for social engagement.  When mice lived in rich environments, their brains underwent physical changes: More neurons were generated in the brain’s memory center, the hippocampus, and strong synaptic activity supported learning.  Even mice that had their genomes altered to develop the equivalent of Alzheimer’s disease experienced enhanced brain activity and performed better in maze tests that they had previously flunked.  Other studies in humans have showed similar results.

https://www.wsj.com/articles/can-an-active-lifestyle-help-ward-off-alzheimers-11614264941

 

Monterey, CA Alzheimer’s Sufferers Get New Hope

According to a study which was published in The New England Journal of Medicine, Eli Lilly and Company’s experimental drug could slow the cognitive decline of those suffering from Alzheimer’s disease.  The downside, however, is that the drug is intravenous, not in a pill form.  An early clinical trial studied 257 with early signs of Alzheimer’s.  Of those, 131 received the drug and 126 received a placebo.  Researchers found that those who got the drug showed a slowing of cognitive decline and the ability to perform daily functions by 32% after 76 weeks, compared to those who received a placebo.   The study also looked at the build up of amyloid beta plaque and tau proteins, both of which are signs of Alzheimer’s disease.  At the 52-week mark in the Phase 2 Clinical Trial, almost 60% of participants who received the drug were amyloid-negative.  At week 76, amyloid plaque levels decreased by 85% in those taking the drug versus those who received the placebo.  Regular readers of my blog know that both my father and grandmother had this terrible disease when they passed away.  There are great people at our local chapter of Alzheimer’s Association in Ryan’s Ranch.  They also have a 24-hour hotline if you need support at 800-272-3900.

Monterey, CA Alzheimer’s Association Has Touching Blog

The Alzheimer’s Association has a touching blog where family members can share cherished items and moments spent with loved ones suffering from dementia.  The blogs share touching moments via video, and it is really heart breaking to watch some of them, although clearly there are lessons to be learned.   Regular readers of my blog know that both my father and grandmother had this terrible disease when they passed away.  There are great people at our local chapter of Alzheimer’s Association in Ryan’s Ranch.  They also have a 24-hour hotline if you need support at 800-272-3900.

https://www.alz.org/blog/alz/march-2021-(1)/these-things-people-affected-by-alzheimers-share-c?WT.mc_id=enews2021_03_12&utm_source=enews-aff-20&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=enews-2021-03-12&utm_content=homeoffice&utm_term=Story2

Billionaire Uses Dementia As An Excuse To Deflect Fraud Charges

Billionaire Robert Brockman is claiming dementia as an excuse to deflect charges that he used offshore accounts to conceal roughly $2 billion in income from the Internal Revenue Service.  Brockman has pleaded not guilty to 39 criminal counts and claimed in court documents that he cannot be tried because he is suffering from dementia and is unable to assist in his own defense. Prosecutors countered this argument, saying that he could be faking a mental decline in order to avoid charges.  A competency hearing is scheduled for June, and if the court sides with Brockman all charges could be dropped.  Prosecutors say that Brockman’s doctors have an apparent conflict of interest because they are affiliated with Baylor College of Medicine, which the Brockman Trust has donated millions to, as well as Brockman serving as a Board Trustee.  Prosecutors allege that Brockman began seeking medical evaluations shortly after a 2018 raid on the home of Bermuda attorney Evatt Tamine, who helps manage the offshore funds.  Tamine has agreed to cooperate with authorities and has given them access to an encrypted email server.  He says that he was instructed by Brockman to keep records on an encrypted USB dongle carried in a different location in luggage when traveling and to run a program called “Evidence Eliminator,” on the dongle.

https://www.wsj.com/articles/former-ceo-accused-of-biggest-tax-fraud-ever-wins-transfer-of-case-to-houston-11609802702

 

Alzheimer’s Association To Host Webinar on the Impact on South Asians 3/7

Join the Alzheimer’s Association on Sunday, March 7 for a webinar on the impact of Alzheimer’s disease on South Asians at 3:00 to 5:00 p.m. PST.  This two-hour session will highlight the latest in Alzheimer’s research, ways to reduce your risk, as well as cultural implications.  The key topic will be : The Science Behind Alzheimer’s Dementia Care in India, Healthy Living for Your Body and Brain.  To register, call 1-800-272-3900.

https://www.communityresourcefinder.org/ResourceView/Index?id=2121395&_ga=2.18995633.809881495.1612807389-2086572759.1603741592

Monterey, CA Alzheimer’s Association Is There For You When You Need Support

The Alzheimer’s Association just released its latest edition of its annual Alzheimer’s Disease Facts And Figures report, with tidbits like these:

More than 6 million Americans have Alzheimer’s Disease, a number which is expected to more than double to 13 million by 2050;

Alzheimer’s and Dementia Deaths have increased by 16% during the pandemic;

1 in 3 seniors dies with Alzheimer’s disease or some other form of dementia.  It kills more people than breast cancer and prostate cancer combined;

In 2021 Alzheimer’s and other dementia will cost our nation $355 billion.  By 2050 this number is expected to more than triple to $1.1 trillion;

More than 11 million Americans provide unpaid care for people with Alzheimer’s or another type of dementia.  In 2020, they provided 15.3 billion hours of care valued at more than $250 billion;

Between 2000 and 2019, deaths from heart disease have decreased by 7.3% while deaths from Alzheimer’s disease have increased by 145%.

These statistics are bleak, however, this is definitely worth a read.  It also comes with an accompanying special report entitled Race, Ethnicity and Alzheimer’s in America.  This examines the perspectives and experiences of Asian, Black, Hispanic, Native and White Americans in regard to Alzheimer’s and dementia care.  The report also analyzes the horrible impact the COVID-19 pandemic is having on people living with Alzheimer’s and their caregivers.

Regular readers of my blog know that both my father and grandmother had this terrible disease when they passed away.  There are great people at our local chapter of Alzheimer’s Association in Ryan’s Ranch.  They also have a 24-hour hotline if you need support at 800-272-3900.

 

https://www.alz.org/alzheimers-dementia/facts-figures?WT.mc_id=enews2021_03_03&utm_source=enews-aff-20&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=enews-2021-03-03&utm_content=homeoffice&utm_term=Story1

The History Of Family inHome Caregiving : Part 2 The Race Is On

I first started working with seniors way back when I was 18 years old and I worked at a skilled Nursing Facility in Tigard Oregon. The staff used to try and come up with things to entertain our clients, so we decided to ask some of the patients if they would want to come up with ideas for us to entertain them during slow times in the afternoon. One of the residents asked if we could have races in wheelchairs and we thought that would be a fun idea, so the race was on. The patients liked that idea and some of them started betting on the winners (a penny for the winning wheelchair that crossed the line first), like if they were at a horse race. The hall we used was about 100 feet long and about 8 feet wide which could accommodate two wheelchairs. We would move obstacles out of the hall to make it safer to wheel down and back to the finish line. The patients asked us to use their wheelchair so they could feel a part of the race itself. We had a good time doing this. There was around six of us that participated in the races. There was a coworker who was really good at it and she would win most the time she was up. Of course, the patients really cheered her on by clapping and cheering as she passed the rooms. The patients would sit just inside their rooms in order to keep the aisles clear and for their own safety. One time when I was up, I raced against a woman and I’ll tell you, she was good, she won but not by much. The patients kept wanting me to race against her until I could win, but I never did. The thing that I noticed is that it helped some of our patients to smile again and have a good time, for that short while during the races they would forget about where they were or how they felt and just have a good time and they were always better for it. There were a few times that some of the staff would tie with each other and the patients wanted a re-race so they could collect their penny. The second race was always harder than the first so that there was almost never a second tie because you would wear out during the second trip up and down the hall. I know it probably does not sound like it could wear you out, but after rolling a wheelchair up and down an approximate 100-foot hallway twice, it got to your arms. No one had ever had to do three trips; it would have been too much for the arms to take. Of course, the nicer and newer the wheelchair was had a lot to do with the speed and ease of use. There was a time that each staff wanted to use certain wheelchairs because it would give you an advantage over your component. It was not a huge advantage, but when you did need to do a second race due to a tie, it helped out at that point in time. These were good times for both patients and staff and we liked do it.  Also, it was good exercise, and a cardiovascular workout. One time in the middle of a race a foot pedal came off and the staff member lost the race, so the patients that had bet on him asked that they redo the race due to mechanical error. The wheelchair was fixed, and the two staff members went out again.  Then the person that had the mishap in the first race won the second race, and the patients wanted a run-off.  However, the staff members did not have it in them to do a third time up and back and so we disqualified that race, so no one lost their penny. After about a month of doing these we noticed that some of the patients started getting bored with the idea and they wanted to be the ones doing the race, but the facility said that they could not do it, so as with all good things it came to an end.  For more background on myself and the company, click here:

 

Monterey, CA Tips For Warding Off Dementia And Alzheimer’s Disease

Everyone wants to keep their brains working in full order as long as possible, and the key can be healthy living, getting the proper amount of exercise and social interaction.  The latter is easier said than done given the massive spreading of coronavirus.  Although board games can be fun, with COVID-19 many seniors are turning to video games.  According to an AARP survey, 44% of adults over the age of 50 played video games in 2019 versus 38% in 2016.  That’s 10 million more older gamers!  About a quarter of gamers play multiuser games, which can increase social interaction which will hopefully ward off early onset of Alzheimer’s Disease.  Regular readers of my blog know that both my father and grandmother had this terrible disease when they passed away.  There are great people at our local chapter of Alzheimer’s Association in Ryan’s Ranch.  They also have a 24-hour hotline if you need support at 800-272-3900.

 

Monterey, CA Coronavirus Update From A Carmel Caregiver : Alzheimer’s & Dementia Huge Risk Factors

There were 63 new COVID-19 cases announced for Monterey County, bringing the total up to 40,971 and three new deaths were reported.  Nationwide, the number of cases are going down.  There were less than 100K new cases, for a total of 27.193 million.  Deaths rose by 4,472 to 471,97.  However, new research found that, sadly, those with dementia are more likely to be hospitalized than people who are the same age without dementia.  The analysis of nearly 62 million electronic medical records in the U.S. also found that Black people with dementia were at very high risk of getting COVID-19.  Researchers said that the data could not be explained entirely by common characteristics common to people with dementia (old age, living in a nursing home and having conditions like obesity asthma, diabetes and cardiovascular disease).  Taking into account those risk factors, those with dementia were still twice as likely to get coronavirus than their counterparts at the same age without dementia.  In California, there were a hefty 11,853 new cases (less than half of the prior day’s total of 26,660) for a total of 3.446 million, while deaths rose by 700 to 45,232.  Please stay home and stay safe.

Please visit us at www.familyinhomecaregiving.com

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2021/02/09/health/covid-dementia-risk.html?campaign_id=9&emc=edit_nn_20210209&instance_id=26954&nl=the-morning&regi_id=105425463&segment_id=51349&te=1&user_id=0fafdefaa53c0a82473acdaa719a0aac