Pacific Grove, CA Aging At Home Is Now In Vogue : Assisted Living On The Outs

COVID-19 has made aging at home in vogue.  The Wall Street Journal recently wrote an article on how coronavirus is changing the way Americans face retirement by “accelerating developments already under way,” physician Bill Thomas said to the reporter.  “It’s going to make people rethink retirement altogether,” Laura Carstensen, director of Stanford University’s Center on Longevity said.  Most people will age at home, and remain independent, she said.  I believe that her view is true.  With roughly 40% of COVID-19 being staff and residents of nursing homes, nobody wants to go into a facility these days.  We have been getting a number of calls from fearful children who want to get their parents out of assisted living and back home, where they can reduce the risk of coronavirus exposure.  Although COVID-19 will eventually be wiped out, there will clearly be more devastating diseases in the future which makes these facilities dangerous.

https://www.wsj.com/articles/how-covid-19-will-change-aging-and-retirement-11605452401

Carmel, CA Aging At Home Is Now In Vogue : Assisted Living On The Outs

COVID-19 has made aging at home in vogue.  The Wall Street Journal recently wrote an article on how coronavirus is changing the way Americans face retirement by “accelerating developments already under way,” physician Bill Thomas said to the reporter.  “It’s going to make people rethink retirement altogether,” Laura Carstensen, director of Stanford University’s Center on Longevity said.  Most people will age at home, and remain independent, she said.  I believe that her view is true.  With roughly 40% of COVID-19 being staff and residents of nursing homes, nobody wants to go into a facility these days.  We have been getting a number of calls from fearful children who want to get their parents out of assisted living and back home, where they can reduce the risk of coronavirus exposure.  Although COVID-19 will eventually be wiped out, there will clearly be more devastating diseases in the future which makes these facilities dangerous.

https://www.wsj.com/articles/how-covid-19-will-change-aging-and-retirement-11605452401

Ombudsman Office Unable To Enter Assisted Living Facilities, Making Some Lax

An investigative reporter unveiled an expose on a chain of nursing homes in California called Country Villa which has 18 nursing homes that have been unlicensed for years.  Two of their facilities lost over a dozen of residents due to COVID-19.   The Staye of California requires that nursing home operators be licensed by the California Department of Public Health, which oversees nursing homes.  But the Department has allowed the owner to operate with a “pending license” for years.  The owner, Shlomo Rechnitz, has acquired 81 nursing homes with 9,000 beds, making him the largest operator in California.  “I’m just a little speechless when it comes to this ownership nightmare in California and now it’s gotten to this point,” said Molly Davies, the Los Angeles County long-term care ombudsman.  In Monterey, our ombudsman said that they have not had in-person access to assisted living facilities during the pandemic, a situation which is just making things worse.

https://calmatters.org/projects/california-oversight-nursing-homes/?campaign_id=49&emc=edit_ca_20210407&instance_id=28956&nl=california-today&regi_id=52105769&segment_id=55031&te=1&user_id=7052b81671c57203c64c377c7522baa7

Monterey, CA Nursing Homes Hit Hard In Coronavirus Pandemic

Almost all nursing homes in Monterey County have reported coronavirus outbreaks, and this may signal a paradigm shift where more people decide to live out their final years at home.  The U.S. currently has the largest number of nursing home residents in the world and accounts for the largest number of COVID-19 deaths in the U.S., a total of 115K.  Occupancy in nursing homes is down by 15%, due both to deaths and a decrease in admissions.

https://www.wsj.com/articles/covid-spurs-families-to-shun-nursing-homes-a-shift-that-appears-long-lasting-11608565170

Monterey, CA Aging At Home Is Now In Vogue : Assisted Living On The Outs

COVID-19 has made aging at home in vogue.  The Wall Street Journal recently wrote an article on how coronavirus is changing the way Americans face retirement by “accelerating developments already under way,” physician Bill Thomas said to the reporter.  “It’s going to make people rethink retirement altogether,” Laura Carstensen, director of Stanford University’s Center on Longevity said.  Most people will age at home, and remain independent, she said.  I believe that her view is true.  With roughly 40% of COVID-19 being staff and residents of nursing homes, nobody wants to go into a facility these days.  We have been getting a number of calls from fearful children who want to get their parents out of assisted living and back home, where they can reduce the risk of coronavirus exposure.  Although COVID-19 will eventually be wiped out, there will clearly be more devastating diseases in the future which makes these facilities dangerous.   

https://www.wsj.com/articles/how-covid-19-will-change-aging-and-retirement-11605452401

 

Cottages Of Carmel Assisted Living Reports More Coronavirus Cases

Four more residents and seven workers have tested positive for COVID-19 at The Cottages of Carmel.  Executive Director Alton Mendelson told the Carmel Pine Cone, “These residents and employees were immediately isolated, minimizing the risk of exposure to others in our community. Eight of the employees have already returned to work after resolution of all symptoms and required self-isolation,” he noted.  Management said they are in contact with residents and their families almost daily and is committed to providing accurate information and being transparent.

http://pineconearchive.fileburstcdn.com/201211PCA.pdf

Carmel, CA Assisted Living Center Cottages Of Carmel Gets COVID-19 Outbreak

The Cottages Of Carmel is the latest assisted living facility on the Monterey Peninsula to be inundated with COVID-19 cases.  Alton Mendleson, the executive director, sent out a message to residents and their families that they recently doubled the number of positives from eight to 16.  “If you did not hear from us today, then your loved one had a negative test result,” said Mendleson.  In addition to the residents, 10 workers have been infected and one is isolated at home with symptoms, but hasn’t been tested yet.  The facility had been coronavirus free until November.

http://pineconearchive.fileburstcdn.com/201204PCA.pdf

Monterey, CA Nursing Home Cases Of Coronavirus Exploding

The number of COVID-19 cases in nursing homes across the nation are exploding, and both Monterey and Santa Cruz counties have been no exception.  Despite federal efforts to shield residents through aggressive testing and visitor restrictions, these don’t appear to be working.  Federal data shows that there were 10,279 COVID-19 cases during the week of November, the last week the data has been reported.  The number surpassed the previous record of 9,903 cases in late July, according to the American Health Care Association and National Center for Assisted Living.  “We have been begging people the last eight months to wear a mask, socially distance and be careful,” said Mark Parkinson, president and CEO of AHCA/NCAL.  “Unfortunately, the public has not listened and or complied.  Please, be safe!

Monterey, CA COVID-19 Puts A Pause On Moves Into Assisted Living

In the September 20 AARP Bulletin, one member wrote in and said that her parents have become less mobile and more forgetful since isolation began and said, “I know nursing homes are scary places right now.  What about assisted living?”  You may not have that option, AARP responds.  About a third of senior living communities are not taking new residents due to the coronavirus.  And even if you could find one, AARP writes that they would hesitate.  Many have no trained medical staff, and are regulated loosely.  And the very activities that once made them attractive—social activities, communal dining, and field trips—have been suspended.  AARP Bulletin recommends in-home help, including guided exercise and physical therapy.  They also said to consider ramping up online video visits to keep them interactive with the family.