Carmel, CA Tips For Warding Off Dementia And Alzheimer’s Disease

Everyone wants to keep their brains working in full order as long as possible, and the key can be healthy living, getting the proper amount of exercise and social interaction.  The latter is easier said than done given the massive spreading of coronavirus.  Although board games can be fun, with COVID-19 many seniors are turning to video games.  According to an AARP survey, 44% of adults over the age of 50 played video games in 2019 versus 38% in 2016.  That’s 10 million more older gamers!  About a quarter of gamers play multiuser games, which can increase social interaction which will hopefully ward off early onset of Alzheimer’s Disease.  Regular readers of my blog know that both my father and grandmother had this terrible disease when they passed away.  There are great people at our local chapter of Alzheimer’s Association in Ryan’s Ranch.  They also have a 24-hour hotline if you need support at 800-272-3900.

Monterey, CA Tips For Warding Off Dementia And Alzheimer’s Disease

Everyone wants to keep their brains working in full order as long as possible, and the key can be healthy living, getting the proper amount of exercise and social interaction.  The latter is easier said than done given the massive spreading of coronavirus.  Although board games can be fun, with COVID-19 many seniors are turning to video games.  According to an AARP survey, 44% of adults over the age of 50 played video games in 2019 versus 38% in 2016.  That’s 10 million more older gamers!  About a quarter of gamers play multiuser games, which can increase social interaction which will hopefully ward off early onset of Alzheimer’s Disease.  Regular readers of my blog know that both my father and grandmother had this terrible disease when they passed away.  There are great people at our local chapter of Alzheimer’s Association in Ryan’s Ranch.  They also have a 24-hour hotline if you need support at 800-272-3900.

 

The History Of Family inHome Caregiving: Part 3 : Alzheimer’s

Working in this industry really takes a toll on a person after a while and I have been working in this industry on and off for over twenty years. There is a lot of things that happen that surprises people that do not work as a caregiver or as a hands-on owner of a Home Care Organization like I have in Carmel, California. One such circumstance happened when I was working for a Skilled Nursing Facility on the Alzheimer’s wing (now it is call a memory ward). I was making my rounds in the early afternoon helping our patients with eating and getting cleaned up after lunch when all of a sudden, I heard a loud scream at the other end of the hall, so I took off to see what the commotion was. As I was walking fast down the hallway, I heard a thump as if someone fell to the floor. When I came around the corner and looked in the room, one of our patients was on top of her husband who had fallen to the floor. She was having a very violent episode and was attacking her husband and did not know who he was. I called for some help so we could stop her and get her back into bed and the nurse came in to give her some medication to calm her down. This might not seem so strange to those that know Alzheimer’s disease, but what made this surreal to me at the time was that his wife was only about 5’3” and weighed about 95 lbs. and the husband was a big man (about 6’2” and weighing about 190 lbs.), so to see him on the floor with her on top of him was a shock to me. After everything calmed down, I asked him what had happened. He said that he came into the room and gave her a kiss hello and then turned around to go open the window a little to get some fresh air. As he turned and approached the end of the bed, he heard her scream, by the time he turned around to see what was going on, she was standing on top of the bed at the end and jumped onto him causing him to lose his balance and fall down (fortunately no one was hurt) to the floor with her on top of him.  She just keep hitting him until we were able to remove her. I am amazed at the things that happen when a person that has Alzheimers disease acts out. As regular readers of my blog know, I took care of my Grandmother in my home in Carmel Valley (used to be Salinas, they keep changing our zip code) for 5 years. She was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s when she was about 92 and there was times that she would go through stages of paranoia, screaming fits, trying to leave by calling cabs, and a variety of other acts that were very strange. The one thing that people that are working with family members, loved one, patients or clients, need to remember is that it is the disease that makes them act out in these strange ways. There are medications that can help. Once we were able to get Nana on a regimen of the correct medications and the correct doses, we were able to start having a better time, but it took a while to get there. Up until about the last month we were going out to dinners on Friday’s which she loved to do. She had her favorite places, some in Pacific Grove and Carmel-by-the-Sea, and Carmel Valley. So, for all of you family members that are taking care of a loved one that has Dementia or Alzheimers remember to take some respite, you need to take care of yourselves in order to be able to take care of your loved one.  It is not an easy task. The emotional, mental, and physical tasks take a lot out of a person and you will not be in the best shape for your family member or loved one if you do not take care of yourself also. There are companies like mine, Family inHome Caregiving of Monterey, that can come in and take care of your loved one from a few hours a day and up, so you can take that time off to regenerate your batteries and come back refreshed and start anew.  To learn more about myself and my company click here:

https://www.familyinhomecaregiving.com/the-history-of-family-inhome-caregiving-part-1-the-rocking-chair/

and here:

https://www.familyinhomecaregiving.com/the-history-of-family-inhome-caregiving-part-2-the-race-is-on/

Monterey, CA Alzheimer’s Association Partners With AARP on Understanding Alzheimer’s & Dementia Webinar

Join Alzheimer’s Association and AARP on March 30 at 3:00 p.m. for a webinar on Understanding Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia.  They will give you a great framework to guide both you and a loved one through this difficult process.  To register, click on this link:

https://action.alz.org/PersonifyEbusiness/Events/ALZ/MeetingRegistration.aspx?productId=73583196

Regular readers of my blog know that both my father and grandmother had this terrible disease when they passed away.  There are great people at our local chapter of Alzheimer’s Association in Ryan’s Ranch.  They also have a 24-hour hotline if you need support at 800-272-3900.

https://action.alz.org/PersonifyEbusiness/Default.aspx?TabID=1356&productId=73583196

Alzheimer’s Association Partners With AARP on Understanding Alzheimer’s & Dementia Webinar

Join Alzheimer’s Association and AARP on March 30 at 3:00 p.m. for a webinar on Understanding Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia.  They will give you a great framework to guide both you and a loved one through this difficult process.  To register, click on this link:

https://action.alz.org/PersonifyEbusiness/Events/ALZ/MeetingRegistration.aspx?productId=73583196

Regular readers of my blog know that both my father and grandmother had this terrible disease when they passed away.  There are great people at our local chapter of Alzheimer’s Association in Ryan’s Ranch.  They also have a 24-hour hotline if you need support at 800-272-3900.

https://action.alz.org/PersonifyEbusiness/Default.aspx?TabID=1356&productId=73583196

Alzheimer’s Association Partners With AARP on Understanding Alzheimer’s & Dementia Webinar

Join Alzheimer’s Association and AARP on March 30 at 3:00 p.m. for a webinar on Understanding Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia.  They will give you a great framework to guide both you and a loved one through this difficult process.  To register, click on this link:

https://action.alz.org/PersonifyEbusiness/Events/ALZ/MeetingRegistration.aspx?productId=73583196

Regular readers of my blog know that both my father and grandmother had this terrible disease when they passed away.  There are great people at our local chapter of Alzheimer’s Association in Ryan’s Ranch.  They also have a 24-hour hotline if you need support at 800-272-3900.

https://action.alz.org/PersonifyEbusiness/Default.aspx?TabID=1356&productId=73583196

Carmel, CA Alzheimer’s Disease Can Be Kept At Bay By Having An Active Lifestyle

At Family inHome Caregiving we believe it’s important for our senior clients to have a healthy diet, social interaction and the proper amount of exercise.  That can be a challenge with COVID-19, particularly social interaction.  Teach your loved ones how to use zoom or skype.  A telephone call now and again is fine, but it’s not enough.  Seniors need face-to-face interaction with their family.  The Wall Street Journal recently ran a story about this issue, and pointed to a study where researchers compared the cognitive performance of mice who lived alone in empty cages with those who lived in large houses equipped with colorful Lego blocks for mental stimulation, running wheels for exercise and other mice for social engagement.  When mice lived in rich environments, their brains underwent physical changes: More neurons were generated in the brain’s memory center, the hippocampus, and strong synaptic activity supported learning.  Even mice that had their genomes altered to develop the equivalent of Alzheimer’s disease experienced enhanced brain activity and performed better in maze tests that they had previously flunked.  Other studies in humans have showed similar results.

https://www.wsj.com/articles/can-an-active-lifestyle-help-ward-off-alzheimers-11614264941

 

Monterey, CA Alzheimer’s Sufferers Get New Hope

According to a study which was published in The New England Journal of Medicine, Eli Lilly and Company’s experimental drug could slow the cognitive decline of those suffering from Alzheimer’s disease.  The downside, however, is that the drug is intravenous, not in a pill form.  An early clinical trial studied 257 with early signs of Alzheimer’s.  Of those, 131 received the drug and 126 received a placebo.  Researchers found that those who got the drug showed a slowing of cognitive decline and the ability to perform daily functions by 32% after 76 weeks, compared to those who received a placebo.   The study also looked at the build up of amyloid beta plaque and tau proteins, both of which are signs of Alzheimer’s disease.  At the 52-week mark in the Phase 2 Clinical Trial, almost 60% of participants who received the drug were amyloid-negative.  At week 76, amyloid plaque levels decreased by 85% in those taking the drug versus those who received the placebo.  Regular readers of my blog know that both my father and grandmother had this terrible disease when they passed away.  There are great people at our local chapter of Alzheimer’s Association in Ryan’s Ranch.  They also have a 24-hour hotline if you need support at 800-272-3900.

Monterey, CA Alzheimer’s Association Has Touching Blog

The Alzheimer’s Association has a touching blog where family members can share cherished items and moments spent with loved ones suffering from dementia.  The blogs share touching moments via video, and it is really heart breaking to watch some of them, although clearly there are lessons to be learned.   Regular readers of my blog know that both my father and grandmother had this terrible disease when they passed away.  There are great people at our local chapter of Alzheimer’s Association in Ryan’s Ranch.  They also have a 24-hour hotline if you need support at 800-272-3900.

https://www.alz.org/blog/alz/march-2021-(1)/these-things-people-affected-by-alzheimers-share-c?WT.mc_id=enews2021_03_12&utm_source=enews-aff-20&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=enews-2021-03-12&utm_content=homeoffice&utm_term=Story2

Billionaire Uses Dementia As An Excuse To Deflect Fraud Charges

Billionaire Robert Brockman is claiming dementia as an excuse to deflect charges that he used offshore accounts to conceal roughly $2 billion in income from the Internal Revenue Service.  Brockman has pleaded not guilty to 39 criminal counts and claimed in court documents that he cannot be tried because he is suffering from dementia and is unable to assist in his own defense. Prosecutors countered this argument, saying that he could be faking a mental decline in order to avoid charges.  A competency hearing is scheduled for June, and if the court sides with Brockman all charges could be dropped.  Prosecutors say that Brockman’s doctors have an apparent conflict of interest because they are affiliated with Baylor College of Medicine, which the Brockman Trust has donated millions to, as well as Brockman serving as a Board Trustee.  Prosecutors allege that Brockman began seeking medical evaluations shortly after a 2018 raid on the home of Bermuda attorney Evatt Tamine, who helps manage the offshore funds.  Tamine has agreed to cooperate with authorities and has given them access to an encrypted email server.  He says that he was instructed by Brockman to keep records on an encrypted USB dongle carried in a different location in luggage when traveling and to run a program called “Evidence Eliminator,” on the dongle.

https://www.wsj.com/articles/former-ceo-accused-of-biggest-tax-fraud-ever-wins-transfer-of-case-to-houston-11609802702